Pitino Says 2016-17 Will Be Last Season | Zagsblog
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Adam Zagoria covers basketball at all levels. He is the author of two books and an award-winning journalist whose articles have appeared in ESPN The Magazine, SLAM, Sheridan Hoops, Sports Illustrated, Basketball Times and in newspapers nationwide.
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Tuesday / June 28.
  • Pitino Says 2016-17 Will Be Last Season

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    Rick Pitino didn’t use the word “retire,” but he said Tuesday that 2016-17 will be his last season as a basketball coach.

    “When you’re 59, you’re realistic that you don’t have a whole lot of years left,” Pitino said before the No. 4 Cardinals played No. 12 Georgetown on Wednesday. “My contract’s going to run out in 2017. I’m not coaching anymore after that.”

    Pitino has led three programs — Providence, Kentucky and Louisville — to the Final Four, and has also coached the Knicks and Boston Celtics.

    He was given a four-year contract extension in August and will make $3 million in base salary until the end of the 2013 season. After that, he makes $3.9 million annually.

    Pitino is 253-96 in his 11th season at Louisville, which reached the Final Four in 2005.

    After Georgetown, Louisville plays Kentucky Saturday.

    “One thing I’ve learned to do with my age, I really don’t look ahead,” said Pitino, who went 219-50 in eight seasons at Kentucky and won the 1996 national championship. “For years, I’ve been preaching the precious present and having to always subscribe to it.”

    (The AP contributed)



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    Adam Zagoria is a Basketball Insider who covers basketball at all levels. A contributor to The New York Times and SportsNet New York (SNY), he is also the author of two books and is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker. His articles have appeared in ESPN The Magazine, SLAM, Sheridan Hoops, Basketball Times and in newspapers nationwide. He also won an Emmy award for his work on the SNY mini-documentary on Syracuse guard Tyus Battle. A veteran Ultimate Frisbee player, he has competed in numerous National and World Championships and, perhaps more importantly, his teams won the Westchester Summer League (WSL) championships in 2011 and 2013. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and children.