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Adam Zagoria covers basketball at all levels. He is the author of two books and an award-winning journalist whose articles have appeared in ESPN The Magazine, SLAM, Sheridan Hoops, Sports Illustrated, Basketball Times and in newspapers nationwide.
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Saturday / January 25.
  • By DENNIS CHAMBERS

    NEWARK — Make that 21 straight wins by Seton Hall when Angel Delgado double-dips.

    The junior big man powered the Pirates to a 72-61 win over Rutgers behind his 19 points and 16 rebounds. It was the third straight win for Seton Hall in the Garden State Hardwood Classic, and Delgado’s performance garnered his second straight Joe Calabrese MVP of the game trophy.

    “I feel great,” Delgado said after the win. “We keep showing that we’re the best team in New Jersey.”

    Delgado set fire to Twitter last week after Seton Hall’s win over Delaware when he said that Rutgers could be the No. 1 team in the nation, but the Pirates were still going to beat them.

    After starting the game slow – along with the rest of the Pirates who shot just 24 percent from the field in the first half – Delgado stepped up in the second half to become the difference-maker, finishing 7-of-19 from the field.

    NEWARKNaz Reid, Jahvon Quinerly and Louis King were among the flock of recruits sitting behind the Seton Hall bench on Friday night during what was an electric atmosphere at the Prudential Center.

    “It was a packed house, everybody came to see the two Jersey teams play and it was an exciting game,” the 6-foot-11 Reid, a junior at Roselle (N.J.) Catholic who runs with the Sports U AAU program, told me after Seton Hall held off Rutgers, 71-62, in front of 10,481 behind Angel Delgado’s 19 points and 16 rebounds.

    How much talent was behind the Seton Hall bench?

    A ton.

    Guys from Hudson Catholic, The Patrick School, St. Benedict’s, Immaculate Conception and many more. The state is rich in talent, especially in the 2018 and ’19 classes.