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Adam Zagoria covers basketball at all levels. He is the author of two books and an award-winning journalist whose articles have appeared in ESPN The Magazine, SLAM, Sheridan Hoops, Sports Illustrated, Basketball Times and in newspapers nationwide.
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Saturday / August 18.
  • Henton to Providence

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    Providence coach Ed Cooley has his first recruit.

    LaDontae Henton, a 6-foot-6-inch, 215-pound wing from Eastern High School in Lansing, Mich., signed with the Friars.

    “We are very excited to be able to add a student-athlete with LaDontae Henton’s skills to our team,” Cooley said. “He will join us in September with the ability to play solid defense and rebound the basketball.  LaDontae has the athleticism to run the floor and mix it up in the paint.  He comes from one of the top high school and AAU programs in Michigan.”

    Henton, who was mid-Michigan’s first four-time All-State selection since 2000, scored 2,000 points in 90 career games at Eastern High School while playing for head coach Rod Watts.

    He averaged 22.2 points per game for his career and is one of only 33 players in Michigan High School Association history to score 2,000 or more points.  He also is just the fourth player from mid-Michigan to score 2,000 points, joining Marcus Taylor (2,448 points), Earvin “Magic” Johnson (2,012 points) and Zane Gay (2,004 points).  Henton also grabbed 1,210 career rebounds, which ranks fourth all time in the history of the state.  Henton never averaged fewer than 14.5 rebounds per game in a season.  In four seasons, he paced Eastern High School to a 62-28 record.

    “When I visited Providence, I got a chance to spend time with the coaching staff and I really bonded with them,” Henton stated.  “Coach Cooley is a great guy and I felt like I could trust him and his staff.  I am looking forward to spending the next four years at Providence and having the opportunity to contribute while playing in the Big East.”

    In 2011, Henton averaged 25.2 points, 14.5 rebounds, 5.2 assists, 3.1 blocks and 2.2 steals per game while helping his team post an 18-7 mark and capturing the district title.  He scored 20 or more points 18 times and 30 or more points in six games.  Henton also recorded a double-double in 19 of 20 regular season games, including a triple-double of 39 points, 19 rebounds and 11 blocks versus Saginaw Arthur Hill.

    Henton was Michigan’s Class A Player of the Year, the Lansing State Journal Player of the Year for the second consecutive season and runner-up for Michigan’s Mr. Basketball.

    Henton played AAU basketball for the Michigan Mustangs, where he also was coached by Watts.

    “I am very proud that LaDontae is going to Providence College to play for Coach Cooley and his staff,” Watts said.  “Providence has a great coaching staff and they are really going to get the most out of him.  He is excited to play in the Big East.  He’s a hybrid type of player and that should help him with the league being so physical.  LaDontae creates mismatches as he can score in the paint over anyone his size.  He also can stretch it out with the bigger guys and bring them outside and score.  He is a sharp player, who understands the game.”

    (Release courtesy Providence)

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    Adam Zagoria is a Basketball Insider who covers basketball at all levels. A contributor to The New York Times and SportsNet New York (SNY), he is also the author of two books and is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker. His articles have appeared in ESPN The Magazine, SLAM, Sheridan Hoops, Basketball Times and in newspapers nationwide. He also won an Emmy award for his work on the SNY mini-documentary on Syracuse guard Tyus Battle. A veteran Ultimate Frisbee player, he has competed in numerous National and World Championships and, perhaps more importantly, his teams won the Westchester Summer League (WSL) championships in 2011 and 2013. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and children.